Current Trials

Current Trials (actively recruiting):

PROPHECY (Boehringer-Ingleheim Canada),

DATAS-II (CIHR): Dabigatran following Transient ischemic attack and minor Stroke

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02295826

NAVIGATE-ESUS (Bayer): Rivaroxaban Versus Aspirin in Secondary Prevention of Stroke and Prevention of Systemic Embolism in Patients With Recent Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source (ESUS)

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02313909

FRONTIER (NoNo Inc): Field Randomization of NA-1 Therapy in Early Responders

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02315443

CREST-2 (NIH-NINDS): Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02089217

POINT (NINDS-NETT/UCSF): Platelet-Oriented Inhibition in New TIA and Minor Ischemic Stroke (POINT) Trial

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00991029

SOCRATES (Astra-Zeneca): Acute Stroke Or Transient IsChaemic Attack TReated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient OutcomES

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01994720

DOUBT (CIHR): Diagnosis of Uncertain-origin Benign Transient neurologic symptoms

Stroke-Coach (CIHR):  A telehealth intervention to promote healthy lifestyles after stroke: The Stroke COACH

http://www.msfhr.org/telehealth-intervention-promote-healthy-lifestyles-after-stroke-stroke-coach

SPOTLIGHT (CIHR): “Spot Sign” Selection of Intracerebral Hemorrhage to Guide Hemostatic Therapy

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01359202

Follow-up only:

CREST (NIH-NINDS), RESPECT-PFO (Amplatzer), INTERSSECT (CIHR), TEMPO-1 (Alberta Innovates Health Solutions), REDUCE-PFO (Gore)

Upcoming Trials:

TEMPO-2 (Calgary Stroke Program): A Randomized Controlled Trial of TNK-tPA Versus Standard of Care for Minor Ischemic Stroke With Proven Occlusion

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02398656

COMPASS-ND (CCNA/CIHR):  COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF NEURODEGENERATION AND DEMENTIA

 

INTERSPACE: The INTERnational Study on Primary Angiitis of the CEntral nervous system